The American Revolution

The American Revolution

Author: Gordon S. Wood

Publisher: Modern Library

ISBN: 9780812970418

Category: History

Page: 224

View: 838

NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER “An elegant synthesis done by the leading scholar in the field, which nicely integrates the work on the American Revolution over the last three decades but never loses contact with the older, classic questions that we have been arguing about for over two hundred years.”—Joseph J. Ellis, author of Founding Brothers A magnificent account of the revolution in arms and consciousness that gave birth to the American republic. When Abraham Lincoln sought to define the significance of the United States, he naturally looked back to the American Revolution. He knew that the Revolution not only had legally created the United States, but also had produced all of the great hopes and values of the American people. Our noblest ideals and aspirations-our commitments to freedom, constitutionalism, the well-being of ordinary people, and equality-came out of the Revolutionary era. Lincoln saw as well that the Revolution had convinced Americans that they were a special people with a special destiny to lead the world toward liberty. The Revolution, in short, gave birth to whatever sense of nationhood and national purpose Americans have had. No doubt the story is a dramatic one: Thirteen insignificant colonies three thousand miles from the centers of Western civilization fought off British rule to become, in fewer than three decades, a huge, sprawling, rambunctious republic of nearly four million citizens. But the history of the American Revolution, like the history of the nation as a whole, ought not to be viewed simply as a story of right and wrong from which moral lessons are to be drawn. It is a complicated and at times ironic story that needs to be explained and understood, not blindly celebrated or condemned. How did this great revolution come about? What was its character? What were its consequences? These are the questions this short history seeks to answer. That it succeeds in such a profound and enthralling way is a tribute to Gordon Wood’s mastery of his subject, and of the historian’s craft.

The American Revolution
Language: en
Pages: 224
Authors: Gordon S. Wood
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2003-08-19 - Publisher: Modern Library

NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER “An elegant synthesis done by the leading scholar in the field, which nicely integrates the work on the American Revolution over the last three decades but never loses contact with the older, classic questions that we have been arguing about for over two hundred years.”—Joseph J.
The American Revolution for Kids
Language: en
Pages: 139
Authors: Janis Herbert
Categories: Juvenile Nonfiction
Type: BOOK - Published: 2002 - Publisher: For Kids

Discusses the events of the American Revolution, from the hated Stamp Act and the Boston Tea Party to the British surrender at Yorktown and the writing of the Constitution. Activities include making a tricorn hat and discovering local history.
A Short History of the American Revolution
Language: en
Pages: 304
Authors: James L. Stokesbury
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 1993-01-27 - Publisher: Harper Collins

The first one-volume survey of the American Revolution that is both objective and comprehensive, this outstanding narrative history traces the growth of a conflict that inexorably set the American colonies on the road to independence. Offering a spirited chronicle of the war itself -- the campaigns and strategies, the leaders
The American Revolution, 1763-1783
Language: en
Pages: 304
Authors: Herbert Aptheker
Categories: United States
Type: BOOK - Published: 1960 - Publisher:

Books about The American Revolution, 1763-1783
A History Of The American Revolution
Language: en
Pages: 592
Authors: John R. Alden
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 1989-08-22 - Publisher: Da Capo Press

The history of the American rebellion against England, written by one of America's preeminent eighteenth-century historians, differs from many views of the Revolution. It is not colored by excessive worship of the Founding Fathers but, instead, permeated by sympathy for all those involved in the conflict. Alden has taken advantage