Beveridge and Social Security

Beveridge and Social Security

Author: John Hills

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 6610813884

Category: Social security

Page: 251

View: 958

The Beveridge Report of 1942 captured the public imagination with its principle of universal social insurance in Britain; it became, and remained a benchmark for social security planning and its influence has been international. Beveridge's idea was to use universal benefits to remove the poverty caused by certain contingencies, such as unemployment, or retirement. This book considers the influence of Beveridge's ideas on social security, and argues that the reality, over the subsequent fifty years, has been very different from the principles and from the vision he expressed. The first part of this volume outlines the context within which the wartime report was written, the concessions that were made before implementation was possible, and the history of the postwar social insurance system. The important aspects of the social insurance system are considered in depth, such as the state pension, and the principle of flat- rather than means-tested benefits. The second part deals with the diverse responses to Beveridge's recommendations in several countries: Germany, Poland, Holland, Israel, Sweden, and Australia. Despite a move away from universally available benefits to means-tested income support, the editors argue that Beveridge's important legacy has been the notion of a national minimum income: a safety net covering all, and they assess the continuing relevance of Beveridge's thinking for the future of social security.

Beveridge and Social Security
Language: en
Pages: 251
Authors: John Hills, John Ditch, Howard Glennerster
Categories: Social security
Type: BOOK - Published: 1994 - Publisher: Oxford University Press

The Beveridge Report of 1942 captured the public imagination with its principle of universal social insurance in Britain; it became, and remained a benchmark for social security planning and its influence has been international. Beveridge's idea was to use universal benefits to remove the poverty caused by certain contingencies, such
Beveridge and Social Security
Language: en
Pages: 251
Authors: John Hills, John Ditch, Howard Glennerster
Categories: Political Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 1994 - Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

The Beveridge Report of 1942 captured the public imagination with its principles of universal social insurance in Britain. Beveridge's idea was to use universal benefits to remove the poverty caused by certain contingencies, such as unemployment or disability. This book considers the influence of Beveridge's ideas on social security and
Social Security: Beveridge and After
Language: en
Pages: 270
Authors: Victor George
Categories: Social Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2018-07-20 - Publisher: Routledge

Originally published in 1968, Social Security: Beveridge and After concentrates on the development of social security in the U.K. since the Beveridge report. The book looks at the system of Social Security, since it was unified with the Ministry of Social Security, and looks at the extent to which the
Poverty in Britain, 1900-1965
Language: en
Pages: 239
Authors: Ian Gazeley
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2017-03-14 - Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

How was poverty measured and defined, and how has this influenced our judgement of the change in poverty in Britain during the first sixty years of the twentieth century? During this period, a large number of poverty surveys were carried out, the methods of which altered after World War II.
Equality and the British Left
Language: en
Pages: 259
Authors: Ben Jackson
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2007 - Publisher: Manchester University Press

The demand for equality has been at the heart of the politics of the Left in the twentieth century, but what did theorists and politicians on the British Left mean when they said they were committed to 'equality'? How did they argue for a more egalitarian society? Which policies did