Lost Tramways of England: Birmingham South

Lost Tramways of England: Birmingham South

Author: Peter Waller

Publisher: Lost Tramways of England

ISBN: 1912654385

Category: Transportation

Page: 64

View: 515

The city of Birmingham possessed the country's largest 3ft 6in gauge tramway; although the process of conversion to trolleybus or bus operation commenced in the 1920s - indeed Birmingham was the first operator in Britain to see a tram route converted to trolleybus operation - a significant operation survived into the post-war years and it was not until the summer of 1953 that the final trams operated. his volume is one of two that recall that era; focusing on the routes to the south of the city centre - to places like Rednal and Cotteridge - the book provides a graphic reminder that it is not only the historic trams that have been lost but also the streetscapes through which many of them operated have also largely disappeared. - The Lost Tramways of England series documents the tram networks which were at the heart of many of Britain's growing towns and cities from the mid-19th century to the mid-20th century. - Transport expert Peter Waller, author of numerous works on the regional tram systems of the UK, guides the reader along the route of the network and discusses its key features stop by stop. - As well as rigorously detailed transport history, these volumes provide an intimate glimpse into life as it was lived during this period, and the recognisable streets which have been maintained or transformed through the decades. - An informative, accessible and portable resource for the tram enthusiast as well as the general reader, and a superb souvenir or gift for visitors past and present. - Photo illustrated throughout, including many archive images which are appearing in print for the first time.

Lost Tramways of England: Birmingham South
Language: en
Pages: 64
Authors: Peter Waller
Categories: Transportation
Type: BOOK - Published: 2019-06-27 - Publisher: Lost Tramways of England

The city of Birmingham possessed the country's largest 3ft 6in gauge tramway; although the process of conversion to trolleybus or bus operation commenced in the 1920s - indeed Birmingham was the first operator in Britain to see a tram route converted to trolleybus operation - a significant operation survived into
Lost Tramways of England - Leeds East
Language: en
Pages: 64
Authors: Peter Waller
Categories: Transportation
Type: BOOK - Published: 2021-06-24 - Publisher: eBook Partnership

Lost Tramways of England: Leeds East is the second of two volumes in the series covering the history of trams in the city, from their origins in the late 19th century through to the conversion of the final routes in November 1959. This volume examines in detail the later history
Lost Tramways of Scotland - Glasgow South
Language: en
Pages: 64
Authors: Peter Waller
Categories: Transportation
Type: BOOK - Published: 2021-06-24 - Publisher: eBook Partnership

The first of two volumes covering the history of tramcar operation in Glasgow. The book narrates the story of the city's impressive network from its origins as a horse tramway in the 1870s, through the early years of electrification and expansion during the first decades of the 20th century through
Lost Tramways of Ireland - Belfast
Language: en
Pages: 64
Authors: Peter Waller
Categories: Transportation
Type: BOOK - Published: 2021-06-24 - Publisher: eBook Partnership

The first volume in the 'Lost Tramways of Ireland' series features the history of the Belfast system, including its origins as a horse tramway in the 1870s, its conversion to electric traction in the early 20th century, its role in two World Wars, the conversion of the network to bus
Lost Tramways of Scotland - Glasgow North
Language: en
Pages: 64
Authors: Peter Waller
Categories: Juvenile Fiction
Type: BOOK - Published: 2021-06-24 - Publisher: eBook Partnership

The second of two volumes covering the history of tramcar operation in Glasgow. The book narrates the story of the city's impressive network from the immediate post-war years, when the system was regarded as one of the most secure in the country, through the 1950s, when a change of policy