Race, Romanticism, and the Atlantic

Race, Romanticism, and the Atlantic

Author: Paul Youngquist

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317072188

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 284

View: 513

In highlighting the crucial contributions of diasporic people to British cultural production, this important collection defamiliarizes prevailing descriptions of Romanticism as the expression of a national character or culture. The contributors approach the period from the perspective of the Atlantic maritime economy, making a strong case for viewing British Romanticism as the effect of myriad economic and cultural exchanges occurring throughout a circum-Atlantic world driven by an insatiable hunger for sugar and slaves. Typically taken for granted, the material contributions of slaves, sailors, and servants shaped Romanticism both in spite of and because of the severe conditions they experienced throughout the Atlantic world. The essays range from Sierra Leone to Jamaica to Nova Scotia to the metropole, examining not only the desperate circumstances of diasporic peoples but also the extraordinary force of their creativity and resistance. Of particular importance is the emergence of race as a category of identity, class, and containment. Race, Romanticism, and the Atlantic explores that process both economically and theoretically, showing how race ensures the persistence of servitude after abolition. At the same time, the collection never loses sight of the extraordinary contributions diasporic peoples made to British culture during the Romantic era.

Race, Romanticism, and the Atlantic
Language: en
Pages: 284
Authors: Paul Youngquist
Categories: Literary Criticism
Type: BOOK - Published: 2016-05-23 - Publisher: Routledge

In highlighting the crucial contributions of diasporic people to British cultural production, this important collection defamiliarizes prevailing descriptions of Romanticism as the expression of a national character or culture. The contributors approach the period from the perspective of the Atlantic maritime economy, making a strong case for viewing British Romanticism
The Black Romantic Revolution
Language: en
Pages: 272
Authors: Matt Sandler
Categories: Literary Criticism
Type: BOOK - Published: 2020-09-08 - Publisher: Verso Books

During the pitched battle over slavery in the United States, Black writers - enslaved and free - allied themselves with the cause of abolition and used their art to advocate for emancipation and to envision the end of slavery as a world-historical moment of possibility. These Black writers borrowed from
Love Letters and the Romantic Novel during the Napoleonic Wars
Language: en
Pages: 165
Authors: Sharon Worley
Categories: Literary Criticism
Type: BOOK - Published: 2017-01-06 - Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing

Love letters during the Napoleonic wars were largely framed by concepts of love which were promoted through novels and philosophy. The standard texts, so to speak, which were written by major authors who inherited this Enlightenment bearing, responded to the emerging concepts of love found in novels and philosophical essays.
Romanticism and Aesthetic Life in Postcolonial Writing
Language: en
Pages: 200
Authors: Philip Dickinson
Categories: Literary Criticism
Type: BOOK - Published: 2018-02-08 - Publisher: Springer

This book explores Romanticism as a force that exerts an insistent but critically neglected pressure on the postcolonial imagination. From the decolonizing poetics of the Caribbean to the white writing of South Africa, from the aesthetics of post-imperial disappointment to postcolonial theory itself, it develops an account of the textual
Free Communities of Color and the Revolutionary Caribbean
Language: en
Pages: 162
Authors: Robert D. Taber, Charlton W. Yingling
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2020-01-31 - Publisher: Routledge

The tumult of the Age of Atlantic Revolutions provided new opportunities for free communities of color in the Caribbean, yet the fact that much scholarship places an emphasis on a few remarkable individuals—who pursued their freedom and respectability in a high-profile manner—can mask as much as it reveals. Scholarship on